Diablo Canyon Decommissioning Engagement Panel

Public Comments

DateDecommissioning TopicComment / Suggestion:Group Affiliation, if any (Optional)
June 29, 2020Lands

The CA Coastal Commission provided comments for the June 24 2020 DCDEP Meeting on June 24, 2020, regarding Coastal Development Permits that PG&E will need to decommission Diablo Canyon Power Plant. The language provided in emails from CCC's Tom Luster are attached.

Diablo Canyon Decommissioning Engagement Panel member
June 24, 2020Environmental Impacts

When you wear a mask it makes it difficult for the audience at home to understand you. Perhaps just stay home so you can speak without a mask.
Why can I not comment on other concerns here?
I am against any route going through Montana de Oro State Park. Someone mentioned it is possible that some of that land is sacred Chumash property and may actually be returned to the Chumash in the future.
Besides that it will be devastating to those of us who love the park just the way it is.
I don't know enough about all those other forms of transport; it's complicated. Not sure I like the idea of putting any kind of nuclear waste in the ocean. One accident and I cannot imagine the amount of harm that would be done to the marine life, perhaps for decades.
The ocean is treasured and needs to be protected. Life springs from the ocean and we should never put it in harm's way.
Man has already done enough damage. Please don't risk more.
I am protesting that I cannot check off more than one category above.
I have lived here since 1971; took part in the anti-nuclear protests after Three Mile Island. That should have been enough warning. The plant should never have been built and certainly not on or near multiple earthquake faults.
Big mistake. Who pays for all this decommissioning?
The ratepayers I assume; we predicted that when it was built.

Vita Miller
1205 Bay Oaks Dr.
Los Osos, CA 93402
805-704-3173

June 23, 2020Transportation Impacts

See attached letter

SLOCOG
June 23, 2020Transportation Impacts

Please see attachment - Public Comment for the June 24, 2020 Decommissioning Meeting

Port San Luis Harbor District
June 22, 2020Transportation Impacts

How many shipments would be averted if the containment domes (after gutted and decontaminated) were left in place?There are many cathedrals and castles in Europe that are left in place as land markets.

June 11, 2020Lands

Please find attached the June 10, 2020 letter written by community members and others to PG&E and the CPUC regarding the conservation of and sustainable public access to the Diablo Canyon Lands. This letter was written in response to a query by the CPUC to PG&E dated June 1, 2020, also attached.

Diablo Canyon Decommissioning Engagement Panel member
June 8, 2020Other

Why is nothing mentioned about servicing the bonds sold to finance the water for this property?

April 14, 2020Decommissioning Funding

I al for the land lease protection of the spotted snowy owl wolves. call me at 702-301-9097 for all deatils.

April 8, 2020Other

An outstanding share! I've just forwarded this onto a friend who was doing a little research on this.
And he actually ordered me lunch due to the fact that I discovered it for
him... lol. So let me reword this.... Thank YOU for
the meal!! But yeah, thanx for spending time to talk about this matter here on your internet site.

April 6, 2020Transportation Impacts

Hello, I think your site might be having browser compatibility issues.
When I look at your blog in Firefox, it looks fine but when opening in Internet Explorer, it has some overlapping.
I just wanted to give you a quick heads up! Other then that,
amazing blog!

April 2, 2020Lands

San Luis Obispo Mothers for Peace Comments on the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) Tribal Land Transfer Policy

The CPUC has recently enacted the Tribal Land Transfer Policy which allows tribes the right of first refusal to acquire any property transferred away from “investor owned facilities.” This includes Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) and its Diablo Canyon Lands - as well as hundreds of thousands of other acres across the state. San Luis Obispo Mothers for Peace understands that the details and guidelines of this policy have not yet been adopted. Thus, we provide input.

Mothers for Peace supports the intent of the policy which is meant to mitigate historic misconduct. Our concern is how this policy may be implemented.
With the exception of sites located in densely populated urban areas, Mothers for Peace proposes that any land transfers occurring under the Tribal Land Transfer Policy or other entity must be accompanied by a conservation easement. We seek the conservation and protection of the land’s resources (ecological, cultural, scenic) as well as sustainable and permanent public access. 

San Luis Obispo County will be directly impacted by this new policy. In regards to the Diablo Canyon Lands, we advocate for a required conservation easement before any tribal land transfer occurs. This would reflect the DREAM initiative passed in the community in 2000 as well as years of community efforts to conserve those lands as reflected in the strategic vision adopted by the Diablo Canyon Decommissioning Engagement Panel.

Mothers for Peace additionally requests that the CPUC hold a workshop in San Luis Obispo specifically for the Diablo Lands AFTER the Coronavirus risk has passed and BEFORE the final policy guidelines are adopted.

San Luis Obispo Mothers for Peace
March 27, 2020Lands

Hello,

For the past four years I have worked as a Point Buchon trail manager. During that time I have had the pleasure and the privilege to witness the changes to the landscape and marine environment during each season as well as to witness the abundant wildlife each day. I could go on and on about the uniquely beautiful and relatively unspoiled habitat this four mile stretch of coastal bluffs, foothills and grassland terraces provide for people to enjoy hiking and important habitat for native wildlife.
So, I’ll get to my point. I strongly believe that the land occupied by the Point Buchon trail should continue in much the same way it has been since I have worked there - providing managed access for people to enjoy the bluff trail 4-5 days each week and, provide habit for the unique and varied flora and fauna.
I would be happy to speak with anyone from the panel regarding my experience, knowledge and perspective about the this amazing stretch of coastline - one of the most beautiful in the world!
Thank you for your thoughtful, forward thinking consideration.

March 25, 2020Lands

The CPUC should hold a workshop in San Luis Obispo specifically on the Diablo Canyon Lands (since we are directly impacted) after the Coronavirus risk has passed and before the new policy guidelines are adopted; and
Any land transfers occurring under the Tribal Land Transfer Policy must be accompanied by a conservation easement, to ensure the permanent conservation of the land’s resources and protection of sustainable public access.

March 24, 2020Lands

My comment concerns the new Tribal Land Policy as relates to Diablo Canyon lands

The very definition of which Native American groups qualify as stakeholders in this matter is also not clear to me. Are the members or leaders of such groups required to document their ancestry or historical connections to the lands? That would seem a difficult burden to meet, given the lack of record keeping at the time when these peoples were removed from their lands. On the other hand, it would seem appropriate to make sure that those claiming tribal status truly are representing the interests of such a people.

Given that plant closure will not be complete until the end of 2025, and that decommissioning will happen in stages over decades, there is no time pressure at present to make decisions regarding the adoption and application of the new policy. The CPUC should hold a workshop in San Luis Obispo County after the Coronavirus threat has passed and before the new policy guidelines are passed.

It will be important that any future land transfers be accompanied by a conservation easement, to ensure the permanent conservation of the land’s resources and the protection of sustainable public access.

I urge the DCDEP to follow this process within the CPUC closely, and to assert itself into the hearing process as appropriate.

L. Jane Swanson
janeslo@icloud.com

speaking as an individual
March 24, 2020Lands

The CPUC should hold a workshop in San Luis Obispo (since we are directly impacted) before the new policy guidelines are adopted. Also, any land transfers occurring under the Tribal Land Transfer Policy must be accompanied by a conservation easement, to ensure the conservation of the land’s resources and protection of sustainable public access.
Chris Barrett
Arroyo Grande, CA

March 24, 2020Lands

I wish to express the conviction that any transfer of lands by means of the Tribal Land Transfer Policy, of which I strongly approve, include a conservation easement to require the permanent protection of sustainable public access and natural resources. We don't want such transfers to facilitate movement of land from public into private for-profit ownership.

Additionally, it seems clear that there must be a pause in this process involving the Diablo Canyon Lands to allow for a workshop in San Luis Obispo after the Covid-19 crisis has declined. The residents of the Diablo Canyon area should be informed and be able to participate in this discussion process before adoption of new policy guidelines.

The construction of a nuclear power plant on the California coast adjacent to earthquake faults both on land and in the ocean has endangered these people for decades. They should be involved in the resolution of this matter and assured their lives won’t be further impacted by any land transfer agreement lacking a conservation easement.

As a native Californian I had the pleasure of traveling up beautiful Highway 1 many times throughout my childhood to camp in northern California’s redwood parks. It was appalling to me to see a nuclear power plant built on our coast, and sited similarly to the Fukushima nuclear power plant which continues to poison our small planet’s land and oceans. Great care needs to be taken in the decommissioning of this power plant to ensure no further harm comes from it.

March 23, 2020Lands

Dear Commissioners/ Panel Members:
We strongly agree with SLO Mothers for Peace and ask you to consider the following two points:
1. The CPUC should hold a workshop in San Luis Obispo specifically on the Diablo Canyon Lands (since we are directly impacted) after the Coronavirus risk has passed and before the new policy guidelines are adopted;
2. Any land transfers occurring under the Tribal Land Transfer Policy must be accompanied by a conservation easement, to ensure the permanent conservation of the land’s resources and protection of sustainable public access.

Sincerely

Mary Jane Adams and Klaus Schumann

26 Hillcrest Drive, Paso Robles, CA 93446

(805) 238 -4454

March 23, 2020Lands

Return ALL LAND TO CALIFORNIA INDIANS. All land in California stolen from CA Indians and needs to be returned.

March 23, 2020Lands

The CPUC should hold a workshop in San Luis Obispo (since we are directly impacted) before the new policy guidelines are adopted; and
Any land transfers occurring under the Tribal Land Transfer Policy must be accompanied by a conservation easement, to ensure the conservation of the land’s resources and protection of sustainable public access.

March 21, 2020Lands

As a PG&E customer for the past 50 years I, along with millions of other Californians, paid for the lands upon with the Diablo Canyon power plant is located. Now that PG&E is closing the plant, it is only fair that, to the maximum extent allowed by California law, security concerns and the NRC, those lands be returned to the people of California who paid for them with provisions for permanent public access and use. This is particularly important for the undeveloped lasts closest to the ocean. PG&E should not be allowed to sell them for residential development or other commercial development. The most appropriate use for these lands is as parks and open space preserves with hiking, biking and horseback riding trails. The existing access road from Port San Luis and the existing ranch roads provide the initial infrastructure for such public use. Do not allow this unique opportunity to be squandered.

March 19, 2020Lands

See attached letter submitted to the California Public Utilities Commission urging that they conduct a community workshop in San Luis Obispo before adopting the implementation guidelines for the Tribal Land Policy.

March 19, 2020Lands

Due to the timing of the CPUC Tribal Lands Transfer Policy adoption in December before the Diablo Canyon Decommissioning Engagement Panel was even aware of the policy, I strongly encourage that the Panel takes a step back and look towards an inclusive outreach to the local communities and indigenous tribes who were left out of this process. This policy has a direct bearing on the panel’s mission to recommend future use of the land. This is an opportunity to preserve one of the last undeveloped coastal lands with a long history of the first protectors of the land and sea, the Chumash people. The land should be protected and not to be turned into expensive homes for the few.

The CPUC should hold a workshop in San Luis Obispo (since we are directly impacted) before new policy guidelines are adopted; and

Any land transfers occurring under the Tribal Land Transfer Policy must be accompanied by a conservation easement, to ensure the conservation of the land’s resources and protection of sustainable public access.

I add my voice to the Northern Chumash Tribal Council in support of:

1. Commitment to Native American tribal government self-determination acknowledging Native American tribes with equal standing under the law with inclusion rather than exclusion.

2. Commitment to open space and public access to Pecho Coast lands around Diablo Canyon.

3. Protection of tribal resources, sacred sites and culturally sensitive grounds through deed restrictions and preservation.

4. Collaboration with the communities to create a dynamic multi-use sustainable seashore that includes Indigenous peoples, the proposed Chumash Heritage National Marine Sanctuary, the fishing industry, renewable energies, tourism, agriculture.

Community advocate
March 18, 2020Lands

I am a resident of San Luis Obispo and an ardent supporter of the conservation of our local undeveloped lands. I support the CPUC’s Tribal Lands Transfer Policy with the following caveat: the CPUC’s regulations should provide that any land transfers occurring pursuant to the Tribal Land Transfer Policy must be accompanied by a conservation easement to ensure the conservation of the land’s resources and the protection of sustainable public access.

March 18, 2020Lands

I fully support the Panel's recommendation regarding the Tribal Land's Policy and believe the regulations should provide for the conservation of these lands in perpetuity.

March 17, 2020Repurposing of Facilities

Repurpose the plant into a solar-powered desal plant. There is already a good-sized desal unit onsite. expand it and put solar panels up in the hills behind the plant. Provide good water to the central coast.

March 16, 2020Other

We as Californians are making a galactic mistake in shutting this plant down. I am more interested in a discussion of how to keep Diablo running than I am in shutting it down.

March 14, 2020Other

I am very interested in understanding how the decommissioning of D.N.P.F. Will affect the hydro electric facilities such as San Luis Reservoir near Santa Nella Ca.the those located in the Sierra Nevada Mountains. If you could recommend a contact for this info I'd be grateful.
Respectfully
Kim Lachance

N/A
March 14, 2020Lands

Dear DCDECP Panel Members-
First of all- thank you to each and every one of you Panel members who have put in such time, study, and effort to accomplish the many things you have done in such a short time period. The Strategic Vision Report that you have assembled is a very significant capture of our Community's collective intelligence as to how we best see the Decommissioning process unfold and evolve. That Strategic Vision Report alone- is a practical, accurate, and intelligent resource to be used and referenced in all future planning and discussion of the shutdown of Diablo and the transition into life after the Power Plant is closed.

I wanted to write a brief note to the Panel to address some of the many things I heard and saw on the most recent meeting that was televised on Wednesday March 11th. Thank you for televising the meeting in it's entirety and including and allowing the public to participate and comments via computer. For some reason, my original comments did not get registered.

My thoughts and observations and input - specifically are aimed at echoing the two presentations that I saw made by Kara Woodruff about Land Transfer and Use-and Linda Seeley, who made a great summary of the Dry Cask Storage Process.

I thought what Kara presented was a great perspective that reflected the respect and inclusion of Native American's opportunity to be much more included in the process. The accelerated and incomplete Native American Transfer process being formulated by the CPUC is a logical and honorable intent to work with the Native American Tribes who were directly impacted to their Ancestral lands. The fact that the CPUC did little or no outreach to the tribes and the other dedicated groups and agencies that have been deeply involved with Diablo Canyon specifically seems like a tragic oversight, and the fact that they held no local meetings to gather input or discuss the protocol or process seems glaringly wrong- and I was glad to hear the the DCDEP, and PGE were both writing letters requesting that the CPUC does indeed hold a local meeting, and include the goals, objectives, and observations of the Strategic Vision Document - which reflects our communities strong preference to conserve and preserve the open space and land in perpetuity.
Thank you for being proactive.
The historical and cultural perspectives of why the native american's should be given first right of refusal makes sense- and seems appropriate- and I was glad to hear that the letters from the Native American community seemed to support and endorse conservation easements and the overall objective of Conservation of natural lands, cultural and archealogical sites, and the flora, fauna, and habitats that are threatened by both the proximity to the power plant and the stored spent fuel.
I also greatly appreciated the presentation by Linda Seeley on the Dry Cask Storage and spent fuel hazards that will need to rise in value and assesment- as the constant and huge risk of just one of the 80-90 casks stored- can immediately ruin and disasterize our entire coast, all it's prized habitat and value, and make that land completely ruined and changed forever. Through Ms. Seeley' s presentation, I was glad to hear and see that the demands for the most safe, the best possible materials and technologies, the need for constant 24/7 monitoring and the ability to access, repair, remove, transport, and limit exposure to any radioactive dangers. We need to be mindful that when historic and tragic nuclear accidents have happened, it was that- an accident- nobody intended it to happen- but what kind of a response, how rapidly and thoroughly, and effectively the safety responders can contain and reduce and remove the threat will deterimine the extent of the damage. To be clear- there should be greatly increased safety planning, training, funding, and facility development to handle this continual threat. In my opinion, PGE or whomever is the plant operator need to hold the appropriate funding for such dry cask storage in an escrow account- so the general public will know that a mere bankruptcy declaration does not remove them from the responsibility to handle the nuclear waste they produced. Additionally, they, and other Nuclear waste producers should be responsible for continued research and analysis of longer term storage solutions and reception sites that could consolidate and process the nuclear waste and ongoing threat of long term storage. I imagine this will be a part of the discussion on some of your upcoming meeting topics.

As a native plant ecologist, I want to speak up for the many plants, animals, and habitats that rely on Diablo Lands to be left in tact and have minimal disturbance and human interference. I am in agreement with conservation easements and controlled public access- but reluctant to build an extensive network of trails, camping, and other potentially invasive and unintended human interference with the natural habitat. Given the current perspectives of State Parks within our region, I would be reluctant to look at annexing the land to the State Parks. I do like the idea of a long term Conservation and Land Management agreement with Land trusts or Conservancy groups- who can both effectively manage the natural treasures of the land, and provide research, recreation, and appreciatoion for the habitat values and cultural values of the precious land.

In closing- please continue to do the great and important work you are performing. The DCDEP is accomplishing significant goals and objectives as a representative of a broad cross section of the public that will be affected by this transition. Thank you to PGE and Tom Jones- for continuing to be at the table, and participating and supporting the Panel in setting and determining practical solutions to a Post Power Plant future, and being responsible and willing to mitigate and minimize the risks associated with a Nuclear Power plant and all its inherent dangers and pollutants.
Conservation and Mitigation is still the will of the people, and reflected quite clearly in the Strategic Vision Document you all created. The latest move by the CPUC to use the Native American Land Trust act is a seemingly reasonable and honorable act- but they need to be much more inclusive and include a local meeting here in SLO County to include all viable stakeholders in the process.

I look forward to participating in future workshops and meetings and again am grateful to each of you for your heroic efforts and input on our behalf.

Respectfully yours-
Bruce Berlin
Arroyo Grande

March 13, 2020Lands

Dear PG&E Staff and Members of the Engagement Panel:

Please find attached a letter of support for the protection of the Diablo Canyon Lands so that Californians will have recreational access to thousands of acres of wild and scenic land and a proposed 20 plus mile coastal trail stretching from Avila Beach to Montana de Oro.
Regards,
From
Mark Wilkinson
Executive Director

Santa Barbara County Trails Council
805.708.6173 | website | facebook | twitter | instagram

Santa Barbara County Trails Council
March 12, 2020Los Osos

I would like to see your group ensure that all the Northern Chumash tribal groups are represented in decision-making about how the land and water are protected and used. Returning these areas to indigenous control is the most just and equitable approach. I look forward to the Northern Chumash management and the cultural and economic opportunities they would create.

March 12, 2020TEST

test

March 12, 2020Santa Margarita

See attachment

CMA, Central Coast Longriders
March 12, 2020Santa Margarita

1360 Parkhill Road

- None -
March 11, 2020Lands

While conservation of the Diablo Canyon lands has been repeatedly affirmed by San Luis Obispo residents, I am concerned about the disposition of the land's ownership in the face of the current bankruptcy proceedings and looming court deadline for a proposed resolution. It is all well and good to propose any number of conservation & ownership options for public and/or tribal benefit, but realistically, does this present exercise have legal standing under the current legal cloud hanging over PG&E?

March 11, 2020Lands

Tribal Lands issue of Rights of First Refusal:
I do not have a problem with that, however there must be easement restrictions and development restrictions in place. A nature and educational facility onsite would be acceptable, but access to areas that should remain pristine should be allowed only on guided trail walks with knowledgeable and conservation leaning persons in charge.
I am not supportive of any casino or resort like development and yes, please urge the CPUC to have an informational meeting in the County of San Luis Obispo with public comment before any decisions are made.
Thank you.
Vita Miller
805-704-3173
Los Osos, CA 93402

March 11, 2020Lands

It's imperative land transfers from PG&E include conservation easements. County residents have been fighting for this for years. Additionally, the decomissioning project must include protection of and access to Diablo Lands. Thank you.

March 11, 2020Repurposing of Facilities

What is the status of repurposing the desal plant?
What is the status of California recognizing nuclear power is an important renewable power source?

March 11, 2020Lands

I have been actively advocating for creation of a "Pecho Coast National Seashore" (or National Park) since I first published an article recommending this strategy in December, 2016. See the attached file. I'm still recommending that the Panel consider this option seriously for the following reasons:

1. As a unit of the National Park system, Federal funds would be available for access improvements, recreational facilities including trails and campsites, and potentially for re-purposing many of the buildings that are currently under the control of PG&E but which will no longer be needed for power generation.

2. The National Park system as a whole, and this unit in particular, is founded on a premise of broad public engagement and participation by local entities - including Native Americans.

3. As a National Park (or Seashore), these lands would continue to serve as intact ecological units and funds would be available for fisheries restoration, archaeological and historical investigations, and research into the impacts of climate change on this rare coastal shelf.

4. Finally, a National Park would attract visitors from throughout the entire world. It would not be out of bounds to suggest that the economic impact of the National Park services ALONE could offset up to 1/3 of the loss in local economic activity that will result when the power plant closes.

Thank you for considering my views.

March 11, 2020Lands

If the land go to a tribe and become part of the tribal lands, what controls do the Counties have on development as Tribes are a sovereign nation? In Santa Ynez, the County did not have much control over development of private lands the Chumash Tribe purchased and transferred into Tribal lands.

March 11, 2020Environmental Impacts

I am submitting comments to the newly adopted Tribal Land Transfer Policy. First, there was not sufficient public input process on this policy. San Luis Obispo citizens have been very involved in the Decomissioning process for Diablo Canyon. No one was aware this policy was being considered, not even people on the Decommissioning Panel. The Policy should be rescinded and, if it is still desired, a full public involvement process followed that engages all the communities potentially impacted, especially San Luis Obispo County since we are in the Decomissioning process and this policy greatly affects us. We should also be involved in any rule making for a policy that affects the dispersement of any Public Utility lands.

Secondly, the in the Decomissioning Panel hearings, public has given overwhelming support for the lands to be purchased for conservation and recreation hiking, biking and horseback riding on a coastal and inland trail system that will link Montana de Oro State Park to Avila/Irish Hills. The lands and coastline are outstandingly pristine and should remain that way, not developed. This is the largest contiguous undeveloped coastal lands in Southern California. It is unique and can never be replaced. Even the military bases are riddled with roads, target ranges, launch sites, etc. Public support for conservation and recreation is documented in the Decommissioning Panels Strategic Plan and in the SLO County 2000 Dream Initiative.

Third, I think this policy is inappropriate. Public Utility investments have been funded by all the public and all the public should benefit from an dispersement of public utility lands. The Public Utility did not steal these lands from Native Americans; they bought them and presumably anyone else could have bought the lands when they were for sale. Nor did the Americans steal the land. The Spaniards conquered the native population in the south part of California and made Land Grants to private individuals, Mexico won California from Spain, then the United States won the lands from Mexico, but honored the Spanish Land Grants. If there are local people who have Native American ancestry who want land, they could go and buy a piece of land like any other person.

Lastly, if the lands are transferred to tribes or any other entity, a conservation easement should be attached and recorded to any land prior to any transfer away from PG&E (or its subsidiaries) such that regardless of who owns the land (tribal or otherwise), the conservation values are protected and sustainable public access is assured -- in perpetuity. Santa Ynez went through a recent struggle with the Chumash Tribe where the tribe acquired a piece of private land, had it converted to tribal land, and then the County had very little control over development on the land. If the tribe is serious about wanting to conserve the land, they should support a conservation easement to prevent development and to ensure public recreation access on established trails.

March 11, 2020Lands

What is the length of time for the first right of refusal

March 11, 2020Lands

I am very concerned to learn of the new CPUC Tribal Land Transfer Policy and the potential impacts that this policy could have to WildCherry Canyon, other Diablo lands and Avila Beach. During the meeting I was happy to hear that conservation easements could be attached prior to any transfer away from PG&E (or its subsidiaries) such that regardless of who owns the land (tribal or otherwise), the conservation values are protected and sustainable public access is assured -- in perpetuity. I strongly recommend that this occur. The CPUC needs to have a meeting for Avila citizens to hear our concerns.

March 11, 2020Cambria

Due to the timing of the CPUC Tribal Lands Transfer Policy adoption in December before the Diablo Canyon Decommissioning Engagement Panel was even aware of the policy, I strongly encourage that the Panel take a step back and look towards an inclusive outreach to the local communities and indigenous tribes who were left out of this process. This policy has a direct bearing on the panel’s mission to recommend future use of the land. This is an opportunity to preserve one of the last coastal lands that are undeveloped with a long and deep history of the first protectors of the land and sea, the Chumash people. The land should be protected and not to be turned into expensive homes for the few.
Our communities deserve a public workshop here in San Luis Obispo as the outcome of this process directly impacts us.
In order to provide meaningful input for these very important decisions that will determine the fate of the land involved, I add my voice to the Northern Chumash Tribal Council’s comments in support of:
1. Commitment to Native American tribal government self-determination acknowledging Native American tribes with equal standing under the law with inclusion rather than exclusion.
2. Commitment to open space and public access to Pecho Coast lands around Diablo Canyon.
3. Protection of tribal resources, sacred sites and culturally sensitive grounds through deed restrictions and preservation.
4. Collaboration with the communities to create a dynamic multi-use sustainable seashore that includes Indigenous peoples, the proposed Chumash Heritage National Marine Sanctuary, the fishing industry, renewable energies, tourism, agriculture and education.

Sincerely,
Margaret Webb
P.O. Box 702, Cambria, CA 93428
pjwebb@inreach.com

March 11, 2020Lands

Why would this not also go to LOCAC since the lands back up to and affect the Los Osos community?

March 11, 2020Lands

This 12,000 acres of California coast line needs to be protected for the cultural, flora and fauna resources. It should become open space for the general public, with multi-use trails. The trail system should include coastal and interior trails, plus some connecting trails. Back country camps for hikers and equestrians is important. The land could become part of Montana de Oro State Park. The Trail Alliance of SLO County, representing equestrians, hikers, and mountain bikers from a number of local organizations could be a key partner in providing input.

Trail Alliance of SLO County
March 11, 2020Community Outreach Process

This is Chuck Anders, Panel Facilitator. We are having technical difficulties transmitting the meeting. We are working on the problem and will resume the meeting when resolved. Please stay with us. Thank you.

March 11, 2020Lands

Am concerned that the PUC’s order about first rights of purchase is beyond their scope, if there is even a federally recognized tribe over that area, the possibility of unfettered develops, and the fact that there were no hearings in locals this would affect.

March 11, 2020Economic impact

You have had several meetings regarding economic impact... A lot of polite talk... Have there been any conclusions ?.... hourglass... Please comment

March 11, 2020Lands

Will Costal commission regulations apply to Native Americans Sovereign lands ?

March 11, 2020Lands

Please ask the rep from San Luis Obispo County Planning comment regarding cpuc tribal lands policy... Sovereign Nation status, Chumash Casino Santa Ynez etc

DateDecommissioning TopicComment / Suggestion:Group Affiliation, if any (Optional)
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