Diablo Canyon Decommissioning Engagement Panel

Public Comments

DateDecommissioning TopicComment / Suggestion:Group Affiliation, if any (Optional)Uploaded File 1Uploaded File 2
September 28, 2022Safety

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September 28, 2022Proposed Extension of DCPP Operations

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August 26, 2022Proposed Extension of DCPP Operations

I attended last night's meeting by phone and thought I had raised my hand, but I was not called, or misunderstood my number due to being hard of hearing.

I want to add my voice opposing extension of the operating license of the aging plant. Even if there were no safety issues due to seismic concerns, deferred maintenance, etc., its continued operation gets in the way of incorporating renewable sources of energy due to its high, constant output.

It was my understanding from the hearing by CEC that the grid is only challenged beyond its capacity for a few hours a day a few days a year (admittedly likely to increase as a result of global warming). It seems like, if there were the political will, that shortfall could be filled with storage, including from electric cars, and evolving technologies like green hydrogen fuel cells. And conservation efforts have reportedly saved twice the energy predicted in one program and its potential, I feel, is vastly underestimated.

When the offshore wind project comes online and is incorporated in to the Diablo grid, total demand will likely not exceed production very often. Since Diablo power cannot be reduced, that means solar and wind will need to moderate, producing lower revenues for companies trying to put clean, non-nuclear-waste-producing power into the lines.

There needs to be less effort made to protect utility profits and focus on building out more solar rooftops, local micro-grids and conserving energy with heat pumps and other energy saving strategies, especially incorporated in to new building construction.

Abalone Alliance Safe Energy Clearinghouse
August 26, 2022Proposed Extension of DCPP Operations

Script of comments read at the August 24, 2022 public meeting

DCDEP PanelistAdditionalIssuesWithDCPPextension-8-24scriptRev5.docx
August 26, 2022Proposed Extension of DCPP Operations

The attached are personal comments I made in the introduction to the Panel Meeting. They are my own reflections from the last weeks of discussion and do not reflect a Panel position, as there is no Panel position.

Panel memberML-continuation-comments-082422.pdf
August 26, 2022Proposed Extension of DCPP Operations

Please find attached comments by DCDEP Member Kara Woodruff at the Engagement Panel Meeting on August 24, 2022.

DCDEPKara-Woodruff-Comments-DCDEP-Meeting-August-24-2022.pdf
August 25, 2022Proposed Extension of DCPP Operations

Three signitories to the 2016 Shutdown Agreement regarding Diablo Canyon, Natural Resources Defense Council (“NRDC”), Friends of the Earth (“FOE”), and Environment California recently submitted written comments concerning future operation of the Diablo Canyon Power Plant to the California Energy Commission.

Included, were these statements:
"The Joint Proposal is not only a binding legal contract between PG&E and the other Signatory Parties. It is also the cornerstone of established and well-founded State policy and law in California."

"This Commission and the California Independent System Operator (“CAISO”), along with the Public Utilities Commission and the other agencies of California State Government, as well as the Governor and the Legislature, need to pull back from the hastily-conceived and poorly-reasoned proposal to extend the operation of Diablo Canyon beyond its schedule retirement dates in 2024-2025."

"Moreover, as we will discuss below, any such attempt by the State of California to force a material deviation from the terms of the Joint Proposal would violate the Contracts Clause of the U.S. Constitution (Art. I, Sec. 10, Clause 1), which provides that “No State shall . . . pass any . . . Law impairing the Obligation of Contracts . . .” Thus, attempting to extend Diablo Canyon’s operations beyond 2024-2025, contrary to the express terms of the Joint Proposal, would not only be exceedingly bad State policy, it also would be unlawful."

On this basis alone, the Diablo extension project should be terminated immediately.

EON - the Ecological Options NetworkkNRDC-Comments_CEC-Docket-Joint-Comments-of-NRDC-et-al.pdf
August 25, 2022Proposed Extension of DCPP Operations

WE NEED DIABLO CANYON TO CONTINUE OPERATING

Is Diablo Canyon dangerous?

Nuclear power is as safe as wind and solar. In over 60 years of civilian nuclear power for some, only one plant had an accident that actually hurt or killed any member of the public: Chernobyl. Contrary to popular belief, the ultimate death toll from Chernobyl is not expected to surpass 200. (In fact, three other reactors continued to run there–one until the year 2000.) No country other than the Soviet Union has run a dangerous nuclear plant like Chernobyl.

Although the Fukushima accident seemed scary, it was a lesson in how safe nuclear power is. No one died or was hurt as a result of the radiation release. We now know that the residents would have been far better off staying put. To put this in perspective, Fukushima residents that moved to, say, Tokyo, actually put themselves in greater danger due to fossil fuel air pollution than the danger they faced from low level radiation by staying in Fukushima.

But we learned a lot more from the Fukushima accident. All reactors around the world have been updated to avoid a repeat of a Fukushima-like event. Example: passive hydrogen recombiners have been installed (to recombine steam that splits into oxygen and hydrogen) to avoid the hydrogen explosion that occurred at Fukushima.

But even if Diablo Canyon hadn’t had such safety upgrades, a tsunami is not a problem for Diablo Canyon. First, the plant sits almost twice as high above the ocean as the Fukushima plant and second, the topology of the ocean floor in the area does not support a Fukushima-size tsunami.

Does Diablo Canyon take away billions of dollars better spent on renewables?

Diablo Canyon turns a profit and is an important part of the local economy. It provides some of the best paying jobs in the energy industry. The $1.4 billion it will receive is simply a loan. It will be paid back.

Does Diablo Canyon kill enormous amount of fish and other sea life?

A common misconception. By law, the water leaving the plant cannot exceed the temperature of the water entering the plant by more than 22 degrees. That warmer water quickly dissipates in the vast waters of the ocean.

The only ocean life affected are fish larvae at the entry point of the warmer water. It is a tiny effect given the vastness of the California coast. The coast line at Diablo Canyon is actually a marine sanctuary and is carefully monitored.

Is Diablo Canyon even needed? Shouldn’t we get on with the long, expensive cleanup?

Diablo is very much needed. Already, the unnecessary loss of San Onofre’s clean electricity paired with dwindling hydro generation have set back climate mitigation in California for a decade or more. Consider that California got 50% of its in-state generation from CO2-free energy sources in 2021–the same amount as 20 years ago!

We have to put climate mitigation as our top priority. The climate doesn’t care how we get to zero carbon–just that we get there.

August 25, 2022Proposed Extension of DCPP Operations

Please decommission Diablo Canyon for all the following reasons:

seismic vulnerability
violation of the closure agreement
unlawful cooling system
prohibitive cost
impedes growth of renewable sources of energy
capacity for storage of high level radioactive waste beyond 2025

August 25, 2022Proposed Extension of DCPP Operations

California needs a reliable, affordable, low-carbon electric grid NOW that must be able to grow to meet the demand from energy policies that will only increase our need for 24/7 baseload electricity in the future.
We simply MUST keep Diablo Canyon operating past the 2024/2025 closure date. Its reliable 2200 MW make up nearly 12% of our in-state low-carbon power. To shut it off now would take us backwards on our climate goals while jeopardizing our health and our economy from the threat of blackouts and energy shortages. The NRC has evaluated its seismic safety and validated that the risks of a catastrophic accident are acceptably low. The spent nuclear fuel stored on site will remain there whether the reactors are shut down or not. It is safely managed and monitored and poses no threat to humans or the environment. According to the International Energy Agency, the cheapest and quickest path to decarbonization is lifetime extension of existing nuclear plants. California should continue to show its leadership on confronting climate change and KEEP DIABLO CANYON OPEN.

DCDEPComment-Aug2022-JKlay.pdf
August 24, 2022Proposed Extension of DCPP Operation

Public comment presented during the August 24, 2022 Engagement Panel Meeting:

MS. DOWD:· ·Hi.· I'm Lindy Dowd.· And I am local so I hope I can have two minutes.· I live in Los Osos. Seven miles as the crow flies from Diablo Canyon.· I'm also the San Lucia Chapter of the Sierra Club co-lead for the Governor's visionary initiative to conserve 30 percent of California's bio diverse lands by 2030, called 30 by 30.
· · · The 12,000 acre Diablo Canyon lands are a major conservation priority for the Central Coast's participation in 30-30, as is the establishments of the Chumash Heritage National Marine Sanctuary.
· · · Extending the operation of this aging nuclear power plant would be a major setback in this 30 by 30 effort.· And it is very disappointing that the Governor is promoting this.· There are bound to be bumps in the road to reduce in California carbon footprint and transitioning to a more nature-based sustainable energy future.· But I believe these bumps should be heading in the right direction, not going backwards.
· · · With an incentive-base push for energy conservation by all of us and investing that $1.4 billion in renewable energy and storage, we can do it. · · · Investing in this aging plant is throwing good
money after bad and increasing the risks we've lived with for 40 years of environmental impacts, earthquakes, malfunctions, stored nuclear waste, terrorist attacks, and on and on.· I strongly support keeping the shutdown of Diablo Canyon on schedule and not extending it a minute longer.· Thank you.

August 24, 2022Proposed Extension of DCPP Operation

Public comment presented during the August 24, 2022 Engagement Panel Meeting:

MR. LUCIA:· ·Good evening.· My name is Guido Nunez Lucia.· I'm a resident of San Francisco.· I'm a data scientist.· I'm an immigrant.· And I've been working on environmental issues for the last 32 years.
· · · I support continuing the impeccable safety record of the Diablo Canyon.· It's a question why we are discussing -- even discussing closing the Diablo Canyon. Because if some people here say we have enough power to keep the lights on, why aren't we focusing on natural gas plants?· Right now are· poisoning the air, are causing asthma and respiratory illness all over the state.· Let's not focus on hypotheticals.· Leaving that aside --

August 24, 2022Proposed Extension of DCPP Operation

Public comment presented during the August 24, 2022 Engagement Panel Meeting:

MR.UMPTER:··Good evening.·Thank you, Chuck. I believe you can all hear me.· I'm Louis Umpter.· I live in San Francisco.· And I emigrated into the U.S. from France which is 70 percent nuclear for its energy production.
· · · I wanted to talk about a little bit risk versus exposition.· And this one is for you, Mariam, and the people at the gym.· So it's very important -- a lot of people are scared about nuclear.· And I think it's very important to explain the difference between the risk and exposition.
· · · Nuclear is very risky.· If you like, you know, our near (unintelligible) like, you're going to get radiated and die pretty quickly.· But the thing is we are not very exposed to that.· All right?· I trust people like Bob and the NRC to keep us safe from those dangers.
· · · However, I am much more exposed to, like, car traffic when I am biking.· All right?· And that's in the end more risky for me.· All right?· So explain the difference in risk and exposition is super important. You're never exposed to radioactive materials.· That doesn't happen.· But the safety that we just saw it allowing we can learn from historical data.
· · · I want to talk about the work of the GRC, which is the European Union body for science research which is Europe commission.· And the report from last year section 3.5 report of severe accidents.· Nuclear is on par with hydro.· So if you guys want to close nuclear plants because they are risky, you should also consider closing all hydro and damns that we have, because they are the same risk in the end.· Right?
· · · Also about safety and risk, I want to talk about the story of, like, Japan and Ukraine.· Japan and Ukraine are the two countries with the biggest nuclear accidents, yet they are ones most committed to nuclear today.· Japan just announced today that they were going to restart, like, almost 20 reactors next summer.· And they are going to build new ones.
· · · Ukraine is heavily invested in nuclear.· They are, like, one of the biggest plants in Europe today.· And it's safe even with the war.· I'm still not scared by that.· There's better fights to pick for climate change. The fight against nuclear is just, like, nonsense. Fight against, like -- fight for your transparency. Fight for better transparency with the police and so on. There's better fights.· Thank you for your time.

August 24, 2022Proposed Extension of DCPP Operation

Public comment presented during the August 24, 2022 Engagement Panel Meeting:

Hi.· I live in San Francisco.· And I work as an (Zoom inaudible) policy analyst.· I'm turning 30 next week.· And I'm thinking about having kids.· But I worry a lot about the world that they are going to grow up in with unprecedented heat waves, droughts, wild fires.
· · · And just be clear, I support wind, I support solar, anything to decarbonize.· But we need to decarbonize now.· And we can't make it any harder for ourselves than it already is.
· · · I'm not going to talk about the technical details. You already heard the facts from Dr. Budnitz and Dr. Gibson.· We heard about numerous safety and feasibility
analyses that have been done, not just by the NRC but also by independent unbiased groups.
· · · And after all that -- for those of who you are still living in this fantasy world where you think that closing a plant is anything but a huge step backwards, I envy your blissful ignorance.· Yes, it's going to take hard work and it's going to take money, but we have to keep Diablo Canyon running for the earth and for our children.· Thank you.

August 24, 2022Proposed Extension of DCPP Operation

Public comment presented during the August 24, 2022 Engagement Panel Meeting:

MR. SEE:· ·Sure.· Dan See.· I'm a licensed professional engineer in the State of California. I live here in San Luis Obispo.· I have a masters from Cal Poly.· I teach there part-time.· I spent seven years working at Diablo Canyon as a consultant.· I'm now working elsewhere for the past four years.
· · · Diablo -- I didn't set out to work in energy.· But working at the plant for seven years I grew to understand the importance of energy in our daily lives and what Diablo represents, stable base-load power.
· · · Being a civil engineer my responsibility was seismic safety.· Everything we did -- you know, we -- we, basically -- you know, it's an electrical facility. That's its purpose.· It has a lot of mechanical equipment.· But then civil engineers make sure stuff doesn't fall down, basically.· Simplest terms I can think of, but that's what it is.
· · · And so to Dr. Blakesley's point, certainty. Nothing in life is certain.· Nothing.· Not a single thing.· If we want to get into engineering, the practice of engineering, engineering doesn't give you certainty in any field.
· · · Space shuttle?· Yes, you are correct.
· · · Seismic?· Do we really want to get into questioning everything?
· · · How safe is the Golden Gate Bridge?
· · · How safe is every sky rise in San Francisco?· It as a major fault running through the barrier.· If there's an earthquake bigger than what those are designed for, there's a very immediate and certain outcome.
· · · If there's a radiation release at Diablo -- if there is an earthquake big enough to cause a radiation release at Diablo, this whole county is flat.· It's flat.· Buildings are fallen down, bridges collapse, gas lines ruptured.· This town is devastated if there's an earthquake large enough.· And thousands of people dead in the county.· If there's -- if there's an earthquake big enough to do radiation release -- to cause a radiation release at Diablo -- there's no certainties in anything.
· · · So demanding a certainty from Diablo is -- is not engineering.· It's not the practice of engineering.
· · · Um, stable base-load power?· Not going away. California wants to have all cars 2035 and after be electric vehicles.· Our electric demand is going to go through the roof; through the roof.
· · · We want to kick gas appliances out of homes and electrify homes; water heaters, you know, furnaces, stoves, et cetera.· You know, gas-powered clothes dryer -- our electric demand is going to go through the roof.· We need all the energy we can get.
Kicking off our safest, largest source of low carbon energy, lower than anything else that we have, is falling.· It is absolute falling.· Thank you.

August 24, 2022Proposed Extension of DCPP Operation

Public comment presented during the August 24, 2022 Engagement Panel Meeting:

MS. SAMEK:· ·I'm Jill Samek.· I'm a member of the Board of the San Luis Obispo Mothers for Peace and a downwind resident of Arroyo Grande.
· · · I am adamantly opposed to extended operation of Diablo Canyon beyond 2025 for any length of time.· It should have closed by natural consequences in 2019 when it became economically unviable.
· · · I'm opposed to any further negotiations, subsidies, continued and increased safety risks and environmental waivers.· There is a deal to close Diablo by 2025, for good reasons.· And we must not violate it. · · · It was well thought out.· And it has benefitted all parties; PG&E, cities, schools and workers.· Any attempt to renege on it shows lack of integrity and foresight.· We must not continue to burden rate payers and taxpayers with the tremendous cost of resurrecting this old dirty and dangerous plant.· We must not go back to 1960s technology.· We must not continue to generate even more toxic waste to be stored above multiple active earthquake faults.· We must not expose the region to further risks.
· · · Remember Three Mile Island.· Remember Chernobyl. And remember Fukushima.· People did die as a consequence of those accidents.· We must close Diablo as planned. We must spend our time and money on implementing 21st century energy clean resources, efficiency and conservation.· Thank you.

August 24, 2022Proposed Extension of DCPP Operation

Public comment presented during the August 24, 2022 Engagement Panel Meeting:

MR. HOPF:· ·My name is James Hopf.· I'm a required nuclear engineer who lives in Tracy, California.· You know, it's hard to believe that California's planning on shutting down its largest (Zoom inaudible) in 2025 electricity shortage (Zoom inaudible).· And also it's hard to believe that (Zoom inaudible) shutting down its largest carbon free power generator during the climate crisis.
· · · There was mention of an alternative policy to simply take money for Diablo and give it to renewables and that will solve the problem.· But as Cal ISO said in a recent hearing no that's not the problem.· Money is not the problem.· Even if procurement of renewables and storage goes perfectly there will be 1800 megawatt shortfall.· The single act of keeping Diablo Canyon open would cover that shortfall.· We can't get enough renewable energy no how much money we throw at it.

August 24, 2022Proposed Extension of DCPP Operation

Public comment presented during the August 24, 2022 Engagement Panel Meeting:

· · MR. HETTLE:· ·James Hettle.· The natural resources defense counsel and other signatories to the agreement 2016, which is a legal binding contract, wrote to the California Energy Commission.· And they said this:· Any attempt by the State of California to force a material deviation from the letters of the agreement would violate the constitution, thus attempting to extend Diablo Canyon's operation beyond this agreement is contrary to the express terms of the joint proposal would not e only be exceedingly bad state policy, it would be unlawful and unconstitutional.· That's the bottom line.· Thank you.

August 24, 2022Proposed Extension of DCPP Operation

Public comment presented during the August 24, 2022 Engagement Panel Meeting:

MS. WINES:· Hi.· My name is Paris Ortiz Wines. I'm a Goleta local, second generation Mexican American, and a millennial.· And my family members are being impacted by California's energy austerity policies.
· · · In 2021 Californians saw their electricity prices increase by nearly 12 percent.· Residents pay about 66 more for electricity than the rest of the country.· And as of March this year 3.6 million residents struggled to pay their electricity bills totalling over $1 billion. · · · Our energy austerity policies are placing the burden on our most vulnerable population.· Already we pay higher electricity prices during 4 to 9 during our peak demand because we do not have enough energy.· The idea to use less energy is elitist.
· · · If we are to close Diablo Canyon, our most reliable source of power we have, this will only worsen. In fact, CAISO stated in 2025 the cape (phonetic) will have a capacity shortfall of about 1800 megawatts.· They
have also projected annual electricity rate increases of between 4 and 9 percent between now and 2025.
· · · The data is clear.· When nuclear plants close they are replaced with fossil fuels.· When the San Onofre Nuclear Plant was shut down emissions in California increased by 37 million metric ton of CO2 equivalent. If Diablo Canyon is lost, 15.5 million metric tons of greenhouse gas emissions will be emitted between now and 2030.
· · · To close Diablo Canyon would be an environmental and social injustice.· Why aren't we concerned about all the natural gas plants that will still exist if Diablo Canyon is closed?· Of the debates, hypotheticals and uncertainties these are operating now including the air and increasing emissions.
· · · Why wouldn't we just continue to invest in our existing clean energy infrastructure?· Diablo can and should be operating for 20 years and more. Decarbonization means zero carbon energy not 100 percent renewable energy.
· · · Thank you for my time.

August 24, 2022Proposed Extension of DCPP Operation

Public comment presented during the August 24, 2022 Engagement Panel Meeting:

MS. DUVAL:· Great.· Sorry about before.· Given the extensive safety and seismic studies that I really appreciate everyone's time on, I'm feeling confident that Diablo is safe and reliable.
· · · We've had more deaths due to natural gas explosions and solar panel installations than we've had from nuclear plants in the United States.· Instead of replacing nuclear we should be replacing fossil fuels. By keeping Diablo Canyon online isn't getting in the way
of building any more renewables in storage.· But taking it offline will mean a disastrous hit to our economy, cost of living, quality of life, blackouts and obviously carbon emissions.
· · · If Gavin Newsome could solve California's projected electricity shortages with renewables, he certainly would.· It's much more popular.· But there is no viable path right now· for California to replace Diablo Canyon's electricity, which counts for 9 percent of the state's generation and is carbon free.· Thank you.

August 24, 2022Proposed Extension of DCPP Operation

Public comment presented during the August 24, 2022 Engagement Panel Meeting:

MR. FESSER:· ·Yeah.· My name is Ray Feeser.· I'm a 13-year resident of Avila Beach.· And I feel I represent most of the citizens of Avila Beach.· We were shocked a few years ago when Diablo announced that they were shutting -- or PG&E announced they were shutting down Diablo Canyon.· We -- for residents of Avila Beach we considered keeping the plant open a win, win, win.
· · · First of all,· right now we have a single road in and out.· If Diablo Canyon shuts down the plant and opens up to development our traffic on our one road in and out will likely increase.· We're already at a bumper to bumper traffic every weekend, so traffic is one thing.
· · · A bigger thing is the tax revenue for Avila Beach and SLO County that funds a lot of our schools and will be a huge loss if they shut down.
· · · And the third reason applies not only to Avila Beach, SLO County but the whole -- but California and the whole country, which is the fact that Diablo Canyon is up to nine percent of the state's electrical power -- clean electrical energy.· And I'd like to point out that California is currently 50 percent carbon emitting natural gas and 50 percent clean energy.
· · · And also a third of the clean energy is nuclear at eight and a half, plus hydro at seven and a half.· If you shut down our nuclear and our hydro is at risk due
to the climate change already, and the Colorado River drying up.· But the -- and it's already been pointed out that when Diablo Canyon -- when San Onofre shut down it added 37 million metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent pollution to the State of California which accelerated global warming.

August 24, 2022Proposed Extension of DCPP Operation

Public comment presented during the August 24, 2022 Engagement Panel Meeting:

MS. BRAGON:· ·Can you turn off your computer?
· · · I'm heartbroken and outraged by this rush dumb democratic stampede to continue operating Diablo Canyon with all its monumental risks.· Many alternatives exist if the true motivation is to continue to adequately supply necessary electricity.
· · · The safety of Californians and the continued viability of our gorgeous environment should not be gambled with.· Major nuclear disasters have occurred on average of one every 14 years or so.· We are about due for another one.· Don't let it be Diablo Canyon. Estimates by Ed Lymon of the Union of Concerned Scientists for Diablo Canyon is that it's one in 800. This is a desperate full court press to continue the nuclear industry.· Thank you.

August 24, 2022Proposed Extension of DCPP Operation

Public comment presented during the August 24, 2022 Engagement Panel Meeting:

MS. HARVEY:· ·Hi.· I'm Susan Harvey speaking for the (Zoom inaudible) opposes (Zoom inaudible) Diablo Canyon Power Plant.· The -- California has added more than 4000 new megawatts of reliable power capacity to the state's grid.· That's the equivalent of two Diablo Canyons.· And we need a better plan than keeping Diablo open.· A better plan would -- would -- the other legislation has been presented recently, an alternative to Diablo is a good example of at least an attempt for a better plan.
· · · But regarding the legislation that will be addressing keeping a -- continuing Diablo Canyon's operation, PG&E stated at a decommissioning hearing that the cost per hour to generate electricity at Diablo is 6.57 cent a kilowatt hour.· · I think it's incumbent upon PG&E to make sure that the legislators and the public know what the anticipated cost for kilowatt hour annually will be over the ten years.· And how much of that is a rate payer obligation.· And how much will the taxpayers be obligated to pay?· How much are the stockholders going to pay?· And how much, unfortunately, are future generations going to pay?
· · · There's so many, as Dr. Budnitz made clear, moving parts to this.· It's almost impossible to make a decent risk assessment.· And that's another reason, just from
that standpoint, that it should be closed -- that it should be closed on time.
· · · The other problem with the legislation -- the legislation has been looking at tomorrow and (Zoom inaudible) completely glossed over.· All the problems are completely glossed over.· Listen.· Thank you so much for your time.· I live in the Creston area.· Thank you so much.
· · · MS. SHAH:· ·Thank you.· Next?
· · · MR. ANDERS:· ·Next speaker is Patrick McGinney, followed by Heather Hoff and Paris Ortiz Wines.
· · · MR. MCGINTHY:· ·Thank you, panel, for the opportunity to speak.· My name is Patrick McGinthy.· And I'm a 50-year resident of Los Osos and a stakeholder of the area.
· · · I vehemently oppose the continued operation of the Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant which may be a top performing plant.· I have no background to question that.· But we all know the faults underneath the plant can also be top performing.· It needs to be shut down as promised 40 years ago.
· · · If you remember at that time we were told nuclear power was safe until Three Mile Island happened.· And then there was Chernobyl, which wiped out a whole city. And then Fukushima Daiichi which is still polluting the
Pacific Ocean and has made the surrounding area uninhabitable.
· · · No one in the USGS has said California is 50 years overdue for a major earthquake.· Are we willing to take the risk for another 50 or five or 20 years that it won't happen again or won't happen.· We were told not to worry about the storage of nuclear waste because in a few years there would be a safe depository opened.· It never happened.
· · · We were told nuclear power would be so cheap you couldn't even meter it.· Not true.· Or that plutonium was so safe you could put it on your breakfast cereal. Yet no one at the NRC or elsewhere would try it.· They were all misrepresentations or to say it another way all big lies.· Don't make the closure of Diablo another big lie.
· · · Nuclear power only produces less than ten percent of our power.· Like water, energy consumption must be used for necessities now and not for convenience or entertainment.· As a society we can conserve 10 percent of our energy use.· And we must be encouraged to do so. · · · The $1.4 billion forgivable loan the Governor wants to throw at Diablo Canyon could be put to better use for incentives, solar generation on roof tops, or whatever else would be forward thinking for a safe
reliable energy.· The safe and promised decision to close Diablo Canyon in 2024 should be (Zoom inaudible). Thank you.

August 24, 2022Proposed Extension of DCPP Operation

Public comment presented during the August 24, 2022 Engagement Panel Meeting:

MR. GREENING:· ·I'm Eric Greening from Atascadero. And I very much appreciate all of these presentations. It sounds as if there is a lot more than $1.4 billion of work to do involved with any license extension.
· · · My question is about the senate hearing tomorrow. Normally, hearings are held about introduced legislation in committees and so on.· But, of course, this is a very accelerated process.· Legislation won't be introduced. But there's language circulating -- actually, two pieces of language circulating.· There's what the Governor wants and then there's what's coming from the Assembly. So are both of those sort of draft languages germane to
tomorrow's senate hearing?· Are they both getting heard and attention?
· · · And then the question is:· In what sequence will they be introduced and in what sequence will they be voted on?· And I think the sequence could be very important.· If one -- if the passage of one, essentially, preempts the other, then what happens?
· · · My case -- and, obviously, you are not the legislature.· And they are probably not listening to you right now.· But I believe the assembly language should take precedence.· This is the legislature's job.· Not to take dictation from the Governor but to originate legislation.· They make the laws.· They make the policy. They make the budgets.· They decide where the money will go.
· · · The Governor's job is to execute, not to dictate to the legislature.· So I would very, very strongly hope that the assembly bill gets fully heard, fully voted on before any dictation from the Governor has a chance to go through the same process.· Thank you.

August 24, 2022Proposed Extension of DCPP Operation

Public comment presented during the August 24, 2022 Engagement Panel Meeting:

· · · MS. GILMORE:· ·Okay.· Great.· Thank you.· Um, thanks.· Donna Gilmore.· I live in Monterey, California. · · · On my profession it says a system analyst on large mission critical systems.· I've spent a lot of time researching for the Diablo -- for the San Onofre plant.
And was involved from the shutdown point to the waste storage.· So I've done considerable research, including the transmission issues.
· · · So on the Diablo Canyon, I researched the NRC database for downtime for Diablo Canyon for the last few years.· They average 40 percent -- at least 40 percent of the time at least one reactor was down for the year. 40 percent.· And that's been consistent from 2008 all the way through the year 2021.· '22 hasn't finished yet. 40 percent downtime for one reactor.
· · · And the slide that was shown in the other meeting they are expecting both reactors will be running at the same time.· And so it doesn't -- it doesn't look like that -- instead of being -- helping the grid, it looks more like Diablo Canyon will actually increase our risk for blackouts.· And some of it is planned maintenance and some of it is unplanned.· Every year there has been something.· As the plant gets older there is going to be more things.
· · · So, you know, as a systems analyst, you have to look at the whole picture.· The consequence of failure at Diablo is unacceptable.· And I have some information I can send you.

August 24, 2022Proposed Extension of DCPP Operation

Public comment presented during the August 24, 2022 Engagement Panel Meeting:

MR. MCGINTHY:· ·Thank you, panel, for the opportunity to speak.· My name is Patrick McGinthy.· And I'm a 50-year resident of Los Osos and a stakeholder of the area.
· · · I vehemently oppose the continued operation of the Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant which may be a top performing plant.· I have no background to question that.· But we all know the faults underneath the plant can also be top performing.· It needs to be shut down as promised 40 years ago.
· · · If you remember at that time we were told nuclear power was safe until Three Mile Island happened.· And then there was Chernobyl, which wiped out a whole city. And then Fukushima Daiichi which is still polluting the
Pacific Ocean and has made the surrounding area uninhabitable.
· · · No one in the USGS has said California is 50 years overdue for a major earthquake.· Are we willing to take the risk for another 50 or five or 20 years that it won't happen again or won't happen.· We were told not to worry about the storage of nuclear waste because in a few years there would be a safe depository opened.· It never happened.
· · · We were told nuclear power would be so cheap you couldn't even meter it.· Not true.· Or that plutonium was so safe you could put it on your breakfast cereal. Yet no one at the NRC or elsewhere would try it.· They were all misrepresentations or to say it another way all big lies.· Don't make the closure of Diablo another big lie.
· · · Nuclear power only produces less than ten percent of our power.· Like water, energy consumption must be used for necessities now and not for convenience or entertainment.· As a society we can conserve 10 percent of our energy use.· And we must be encouraged to do so. · · · The $1.4 billion forgivable loan the Governor wants to throw at Diablo Canyon could be put to better use for incentives, solar generation on roof tops, or whatever else would be forward thinking for a safe
reliable energy.· The safe and promised decision to close Diablo Canyon in 2024 should be (Zoom inaudible). Thank you.

August 24, 2022Proposed Extension of DCPP Operation

Public comment presented during the August 24, 2022 Engagement Panel Meeting:

MS. MAROGAN:· ·Hi.· This is Jean Marogan.· I'm calling in from Port Costa, California.· I have a follow-up question for Dr. Budnitz, because there was a question posed to him that I didn't hear a response. And it's about the 2018 historical site assessment report for Diablo.· I'm curious if the Independent
Safety Commission has reviewed the document.· And if you are aware of missing documents and monitoring information that are noted in the report.
· · · And also I'm curious -- I'd like to get your comment on what the safety implications are of delaying indefinitely clean up of known radiological contamination at Diablo Canyon.· Thank you.

August 24, 2022Proposed Extension of DCPP Operation

Public comment presented during the August 24, 2022 Engagement Panel Meeting:

· · MR. WASSERMAN:· ·Hi.· My name is Harvey Wasserman. I'm a resident of Los Angeles.· And I have children and grandchildren here.
· · · That -- the Diablo Canyon reactors are not insured for the good reason.· I want to see somebody who is advocating continued operation of Diablo Canyon step forward and tell me how you will compensate me and my family for the loss of our health and our livelihoods when and -- if and when -- and I think it's more when than if -- the San Andreas or one of the many other earthquake faults takes those reactors to the ground.
· · · Diablo Canyon One is embrittled.· We asked Gavin Newsom years ago to inspect it.· In 2019 we presented him with a petition signed by 2500 people.· And he has
refused to inspect that reactor.· And here we are after -- there were two years of very important, very credible negotiations that went on to come to the conclusion that those reactors should shut.· And now he's pushing forward in less than two months to force a decision.
· · · The 1.4 billion should go to renewables.· And there is no one advocating for the continued operation of these reactors that can come forward and tell me how they are going to be insured.· After all of these years the nuclear power industry has been unable to get private insurance.· And now you can't tell me, as a Los Angeles resident, what will happen to my children and grandchildren when those reactors blow up.· So thank you very much.

August 24, 2022Proposed Extension of DCPP Operation

Public comment presented during the August 24, 2022 Engagement Panel Meeting:

MS. HAYES:· ·Good evening.· I'm a Ph.D. candidate studying nuclear fusion in San Diego.· So I want to address Senator Laird's concerns about waste storage discussed at the very beginning of this meeting.
· · · I spent 22 years living in Illinois about 15 minutes away from the now decommissioned Zion nuclear site.· It only took about two years to construct from scratch and prepare the pad that now stores all of the Zion nuclear waste.
· · · Meanwhile, spent fuel at Diablo Canyon must spend five years in the spent fuel pool to cool down.· So
unforeseen waste from extending the plant's life past 2025 would only need to be added as early as 2030.· This would give Diablo Canyon about eight years to complete an estimated two-year project to extend its storage capacity.
· · · So if we're serious about environmental and safety concerns during a climate crisis.· If we're serious about public health during drought and blackout, then we will do everything we can to protect California's clean energy assets, especially Diablo Canyon.

August 24, 2022Proposed Extension of DCPP Operation

Public comment presented during the August 24, 2022 Engagement Panel Meeting:

MR. HOFFMAN:· ·My name is Ace Hoffman.· I'm calling from Carlsbad, California.· First, I'd like to
challenge PG&E to ensure the plant, if they are going to run it extra time.
· · · Secondly, I've left some comments on your website. I've been wanting to go over some of the people I've talked to in the 50 years I have studied this thing.
· · · John Hoffman was a researcher on the Manhattan project.· Ernie Sternglass worked for NASA.· Carl C. Morgan founded the health physics field.· Marion Falk worked at Lawrence Livermore National Lab.· Helen Caldecott, Archer Marker John, Arnie Gunderson, Judith Johnson, Rosa Leibert -- I've worked with all of these people.· So I hope when you read what I've written you'll pay some good attention to it.
· · · Thank you very much.· And thank you for holding this hearing.

August 24, 2022Proposed Extension of DCPP Operation

Public comment presented during the August 24, 2022 Engagement Panel Meeting:

MR. KIM:· ·My name is J. Hondu Kim.· I'm a resident of Santa Clara County.· I'm a member of All Mothers for Nuclear, although not a mother.· And I have generally been a supporter of this.
· · · In general, I hope within the public comment it's important we talk about accidents or risks or uncertainty.· But the certainty is that we continue to put out an enormous amount of air pollution which has known effects.· If there was any -- despite enormous effects -- for example, as Harry Wasserman spoke about LA, the people -- the people of LA especially -- or go, um -- have air pollution effects that constantly affect the health.· It is a known disaster.· 200,000 Americans die every year early of air pollution.· And yet we do not assess these risks.· We are putting a much higher scrutiny on this nuclear use, fossil fuel use.

August 24, 2022Proposed Extension of DCPP Operation

Public comment presented during the August 24, 2022 Engagement Panel Meeting:

MS. HOFF:· ·Hi my name is Heather Hoff.· I work at Diablo Canyon 18 years now.· I live here in San Luis Obispo.· I run a non profit called Mothers for Nuclear. · · · I appreciate everyone being here and being curious and asking questions.· That's how I changed my mind about nuclear.· It wasn't easy.· It took about six years of relentless investigation.
· · · ·What I don't appreciate is constant throwing up of barriers and issues without listening to the answers. Many of these issues raised tonight have already been solved or are not an issue in the first place.· I'm not going to rehash all the concerns that have been raised other than to say I've had all of these same concerns myself, explored all the aspects and sometimes, surprisingly, found that things weren't what they seem. · · · Everything points to the need for more clean energy and the value that Diablo Canyon provides, not justforCalifornia,butforhumanityandourplanet. I suggest we refocus our discussion on what we care about and then what we need in order to get there.· I care about reliable electricity.· People die in blackouts. Cal ISO says we need more electricity.
· · · I care about clean energy.· Diablo provides 15 percentofCalifornia'semission-freeelectricity. I care about climate change.· All history shows that when existing nuclear plants close emissions go up.· I care about transitioning away from natural gas, which is currently 15 percent of California's electricity.· And I care about energy security.· Right now 30 percent of our electricity is imported.
· · · All of Europe is in a worse situation right now because Germany shut down their nuclear plants and is now suddenly trying to stop using Russian gas.
· · · I care about safety.· There is no such thing as safe, only different levels of risk.· Continued operation of Diablo, even assuming the worst case in extremely unlikely scenarios, is still way less risky to human health and the environment than all our other options.
· · · The choice is clear.· We will always need more clean energy not less.· Some of this pivot will be hard but I think we can do hard things.· I have confidence in our team at Diablo Canyon and all of you to keep driving
for things that we care about.· We can have it all.· We can build a Cal Poly innovation park.· We can do land back for YTT.· We can invest in more clean energy.· And we can keep running Diablo Canyon.

August 24, 2022Proposed Extension of DCPP Operation

Public comment presented during the August 24, 2022 Engagement Panel Meeting:

Good evening, distinguished panel.· My name is Eric Veum.· I am a resident here of San Luis Obispo and I'm co-author of the brief that was submitted to this panel Pathways to Clean and Reliable Grid for California Without Diablo Canyon.
· · · I wanted to come before you this evening to make just several brief points because time is short.
· · · First is that, um, the intention of this brief is to bring together a -- to offer a perspective that starts to unpackage the complexity of the issue around the continuation of Diablo Canyon and to look at, from a system's perspective, the pieces that contribute to overall reliability and success in reducing greenhouse gas emissions.
· · · And if you look at the sources, the -- the brief is highly sourced -- all of the sources come from either PG&E's own testimony or from agencies like the CPUC, CAISO and others.· And so the intent was not to do any original work, but to analyze and integrate the picture of, um, the state's policy and resource availability that paints a different picture that's being told around the necessity for the extension of operation of Diablo Canyon.
· · · And so in brief, several points I'd like to make. One is for those that understand how a nuclear plant operates it is not intended to be used as a reliability of resource.· It is not flexible.· It's a large
inflexible generator that's not intended to meet the needs under extreme cases for a few hours.· It's meant to run all the time and produce a lot of electricity.
· · · The second, in relation to the fact that it produces a lot of electricity, PG&E, in their own testimony during decommissioning, has demonstrated that PG&E does not need the plant in order to meet its goals. And that the PUC has updated the renewable portfolio standard to 73 percent by 2032.· And what that means is continuing the operation of Diablo Canyon, providing eight percent of California's energy, will decrease our ability to move forward in integrating flexible resources like renewable energy, battery storage and others, to achieve our RPS goals by 2032.
· · · So I know my time is short.· But my recommendations and my co-authors' recommendations I encourage all to take a close look at.· And for the legislature to seriously consider them as they move forward with considering legislation in the near term. Thank you so much.

August 24, 2022Proposed Extension of DCPP Operation

Public comment presented during the August 24, 2022 Engagement Panel Meeting:

· · · MR. PICKERING:· ·Hello.· My name is Ryan Pickering from Berkeley, California.· The purpose of my comment is to highlight a viable plan to extend operations at the plant while achieving broad community support and restorative justice.
· · · Diablo Canyon is located on the Pecho Coast, the ancestral homelands of yak tityu tityu yak tilhini tribe known locally as YTT.· On July 27th, Mona Tucker, the tribal chair of YTT sent a letter to the Governor's
office.· The letter expresses unanimous support from YTT tribal council to demand the return the Diablo lands. This land was stolen from YTT without consent, agreement or compensation.· The tribal resolution lays out a pathway towards restoring the land to the tribe for conservation.
· · · The tribe has spoken publicly that they are willing to lease these lands to PG&E for continued operation of the plant.· The tribe was not consulted in the 2018 joint proposal to close the plant, making it invalid.
· · · In June 2021 the tribe registered to acquire Diablo lands through the CPUC's new tribal land transfer police. I call on this panel to support extended operations of and partnership with YTT tribe. This ensures prosperity for California while --

August 24, 2022Proposed Extension of DCPP Operation

Public comment presented during the August 24, 2022 Engagement Panel Meeting:

MS. BABIAR:· ·Actually, it's Nina.· Last name is Babiar.· I'm down here in San Diego.· I'm founding member of Public Watch Dogs.· And, of course, we've been dogging the issue at San Onofre for over a decade now. · · · If you don't think the radiation leak can occur, that's what exactly shut the plant down at San Onofre for a few of your listeners that don't seem to realize that.
· · · I'm originally from Pittsburgh.· And I came in
1984.· I moved to California.· But in 1979 I was an engineering news reporter from McGraw Hill during Three Mile Island, so don't tell me that this can't happen. I'll put some printed comments.
· · · But I just want to bring up a couple of things that weren't discussed.· Nowhere this evening did I hear the word tsunami in any of the seismic probability discussions, which I think is pretty ludicrous.· And there is no conversation about evacuation or insurance or emergency response.

August 24, 2022Proposed Extension of DCPP Operation

Public comment presented during the August 24, 2022 Engagement Panel Meeting:

MR. SMYTHE:· ·Hello.· Tim Smith actually, Fremont, California.· I just want to speak in support of keeping Diablo Canyon open.· I also think it should be mentioned that with all this discussion about it being a very old plant, Diablo Canyon is actually one of the newest plants in the country.· I believe unit two opened in 1987.· And if you actually look at the statistics, the data book, there is only a handful of plants that opened after 1987, primarily in the 1988 to 1990 time period.
· · · So Diablo Canyon, in fact, is one of the newest and most modern plants in the country.· And I think if people are concerned about age of plants, they should be looking at plants outside of California, some of which are almost 15 and 16 years older than Diablo Canyon is.
· · · So I thank you for your time.· And I hope -- look forward to hearing the rest of the comments.

August 24, 2022Proposed Extension of DCPP Operation

Public comment presented during the August 24, 2022 Engagement Panel Meeting:

· Thank you panel.· I appreciate the opportunity to speak to you.· You represent us locally.· And I've had
that privilege at a prior time in my life representing my community up in the state legislature.· So I want to speak to you as an entity that represents us locally. And I appreciate you giving opportunity for those who live here to speak.
· · · We heard a lot about probabilistic risk assessment, which all sounds great.· Dr. Bruce Gibson talked about the difference between a fender bender and what you pay to fix a fender bender versus a more calamitous outcome that may be quite rare but the outcome of which would be absolutely devastating.· And the challenge of trying to weigh those two.
· · · We've seen many instances where advanced technologies have been believed to be safe.· We remember the space shuttle was described as safe and could have 1000 launches without a failure.· We found out very quickly that such is not the case in a complex system. We've been told that transmission lines are safe.· And the people in Paradise found out very personally just how safe they were or were not.· And same was true with the people in San Bruno.
· · · So I come to you not talking about probabilistic risk assessment.· Although I have a doctorate in geological sciences, a masters and a bachelors in geophysics from Berkeley.· I served on the California
Seismic Safety Commission and authored some of the legislation you've heard about.
· · · I come to you as a constituent, talking about the real world impacts of uncertainty.· Why do I talk about uncertainty?· Because what we're talking about here is how sure are we that we are safe or not safe?
· · · There are a lot of elements that go into that, but there is a very important area of seismology which is still under intensive investigation around which we don't have much certainty, but which we would need to know with great precision to say that the plant is safe. And that is the behavior of strong motion seismology and proximity through very large earthquakes that are literally hundreds of meters from a complex facility.
· · · Now, you heard Dr. Gibson talk about the time distance relationships, the distance magnitude relationships, and the probabilistic methodologies that are used to come up with the approximate levels of shaking.· All of that's well and good, unless you are extremely close to an active fault.
· · · Now we don't have a lot of data about earthquakes like that because -- in fact, you are very lucky to have that type of instrumentation right next to a fault when it fails.
· · · There is a fairly well-known example in Parkfield,
California, about 20 years ago where a magnitude 6 earthquake occurred.· That's where I did much of my doctoral studies.· So I am very familiar with the San Andreas Fault.· And what was fascinating with the dozens of swung motion instruments surrounding Parkfield is that when they looked at the shaking, instead of coming up with a single simple number that accurately defined how a magnitude 6 earthquake would produce shaking, they found shaking as low as a tenth of a G at 15 seconds and as high as over 2.5 G.
· · · The magnitude and range of the uncertainty and the actual measurements so far eclipse any estimate that would have otherwise have been made, you have to conclude estimates of shaking in the near field are poorly constrained.· And it's doubly so in the site response.

August 24, 2022Other

Bruce Severance's closing comments on the social justice impacts of uranium were extremely uncomfortable for me to listen to, as an Asian American woman and the daughter of an immigrant. Uranium mining has a dark history of disproportionate harm caused to Indigenous American communities, but none of those practices continue to supply American uranium today. Meanwhile, the alternative legislation that would divert the $1.4 billion to keep Diablo Canyon open toward other renewable sources would fund solar projects.

Solar panels are made by Asian slaves.

This is not a euphemism. 2.6 million Uyghur and Kazakh citizens are in forced labor transfer programs in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region of China. According to a report published by the Sheffield Hallam University in the UK, "95% of solar modules rely on one primary material – solar-grade polysilicon. Polysilicon manufacturers in the Uyghur Region account for approximately 45% of the world’s solar-grade polysilicon supply."

I urge Mr. Severance to read the report attached to this comment and to consider that all sources of energy have varying social justice implications. By (1) not using slave labor and (2) providing reliable carbon-free power during a time of frequent power loss in low-income communities, Diablo Canyon is one of the most equitable sources of power in California.

August 24, 2022Proposed Extension of DCPP Operations

Closing Diablo Canyon would greatly increase the likelihood of power shortages and blackouts. At a recent California Energy Commission hearing, CAISO clarified that even if future procurement of renewable generation and storage goes perfectly, the state will still have a power generation shortfall of 1800 MW in 2025 (the year Diablo Canyon is scheduled to close). The single act of keeping the plant open will eliminate that shortfall.

Some Democrats are proposing that we close Diablo Canyon and direct funds to building even more renewables instead. That shows a misunderstanding of the problem. If California could have secured enough renewable generation and storage, to replace Diablo Canyon while maintaining grid reliability, they would have chosen that path. The problem is not insufficient funding. It’s that, despite their best efforts, they cannot procure and install the needed generation fast enough.

Even with the short-term costs of actions required to extend operation, keeping Diablo Canyon running will save money, not cost money, over time. Analyses show that continued operation would significantly reduce overall power system costs (by up to ~$20 billion). For that reason, PG&E will be able to replay the loan (of up to $1.4 billion). Furthermore, in the likely event that the PG&E will secure funding from the federal, DoE Civil Nuclear Credit program to cover such costs, the required loan amount will be significantly reduced.
Closure of Diablo Canyon would significantly delay the reduction of gas-fueled power generation in the state, resulting in more CO2 emissions and air pollution, much of which occurs in disadvantaged communities.

Even if the plant’s output could be fully replaced by renewable generation and storage, that renewable generation could have been used to replace gas (fossil) generation instead. About half of California’s in state power generation still comes of gas, and the gas fraction hasn’t fallen much in the last 20 years. Much of the reason is that California has been using increased renewables to replace other non-emitting sources (nuclear and hydro) instead of fossil generation.

This does boil down to a question of (non-emitting) nuclear vs. gas. Why is the focus on closing the carbon-free Diablo Canyon plant (first), instead of reducing gas generation? It shows a lack of concern about climate and people who are suffering from the impacts of gas plant pollution.

The Diablo Canyon plant, by itself, generates as much or more carbon-free power as all the state’s wind turbines, or all the state’s rooftop solar. Imagine if someone proposed tearing down all the state’s wind turbines, or removing all the rooftop solar panels in the state, and said that it’s “OK” because they would build enough new renewable generation to replace them, resulting in no increase in emissions. How would you react to such a proposal? That’s basically what we’re doing if we close Diablo Canyon.

August 24, 2022Proposed Extension of DCPP Operations

DCDEP 8.24.2022

I’m Jill ZamEk, a member of the Board of SLO Mothers for Peace and a downwind resident of Arroyo Grande. I am adamantly opposed to extended operation of Diablo Canyon beyond 2025 for any length of time. It should have closed by natural consequences in 2019 when it became economically unviable.

I am opposed to any further negotiations, subsidies, continued and increased safety risks, and environmental waivers. There is a deal to close Diablo by 2025 - for good reasons - and we must not violate it. It was well thought out and it has benefited all parties - PG&E, cities, schools, and workers. Any attempt to renege on it shows lack of integrity and foresight.

We must not continue to burden ratepayers and taxpayers with the tremendous cost of resurrecting this old, dirty, and dangerous plant.

We must not go back to 1960s technology.

We must not continue to generate even more toxic waste to be stored above multiple active earthquake faults.

We must not expose the region to further risks. Remember Three Mile Island, Remember Chernobyl, and Remember Fukushima. People DID die as a consequence of those accidents.

We must close Diablo as planned.

We must spend our time and money on implementing 21st century clean energy resources, efficiency, and conservation.

August 24, 2022Spent Fuel Storage

I am a Ph.D. Candidate and a woman of color. I perform nuclear fusion research as a user at the DIII-D National Fusion Facility in San Diego as part of my Ph.D. work.

I want to address Senator Laird’s concerns about waste storage. I spent 22 years living in Illinois, just 15 minutes away from the now-decommissioned Zion nuclear site. I recently hosted a tour of that facility for local leadership last month, where I learned that it only took 2 years to construct from scratch and prepare the independent spent fuel storage installation that stores the Zion spent fuel. Meanwhile, spent fuel at Diablo Canyon must spend 5 years in the spent fuel pool to cool down. So unforeseen waste from extending the plant’s life past 2025 would only need to be added to interim storage as early as 2030. This would give Diablo Canyon 8 years to complete an estimated 2-year project to extend its storage capacity.

When SONGS was decommissioned less than 10 years ago, its generation was entirely replaced with natural gas. There has been much discussion regarding the safety of Diablo Canyon, which the NRC has reviewed. Yet, there is a concerning lack of interest in the public health and environmental hazards posed by the natural gas plants that would initially replace Diablo Canyon.

According to the CEC's data, 59% of all electricity consumed in California is already carbon-free. We’re actually ahead of schedule to achieve a 100% clean electric grid by 2045. Diablo Canyon alone produces 18% of that good carbon-free electricity.

If Diablo Canyon was prematurely decommissioned and renewables could ramp up production to make up for the plant closure, then we would simply be back where we are today, having made no climate progress. Without Diablo Canyon, the best-case scenario would be to tread water on climate goals just to make up for lost ground. But if California keeps Diablo Canyon open, that massive continued renewables growth would diminish fossil fuels usage and close coal and natural gas plants instead and actually make progress.

If we are serious about environmental and safety concerns during a climate crisis. If we are serious about public health during these times of drought, flex alerts, and blackouts. Then we will do everything we can to protect all of California’s clean energy assets. As a scientist and a nuclear fusion engineer, I am urging California lawmakers to save Diablo Canyon.

August 24, 2022Water Resources

Thank you for a wonderful meeting presentation tonight.
Assuming that PGE goes through with its application for license renewal and continued operation, and applies for DOE funds available for that purpose:
What are the plans being considered to use some of these available funds to extend the capacity of the desalination plant already on-site, per the recommendations of the “Assessment of the Diablo Canyon Nuclear Plant for Zero-Carbon Electricity, Desalination, and Hydrogen Production” by MIT-Stanford, in November 2021, say to increase its size to a Carlsbad-scale, to address chronic water shortages in the state? Is there a case being made for the repurposing of the desalination plant on-site to help average out varying electricity demand with the onset of increasing renewable supply in the coming years (e.g., offshore wind in SLO County)?
Is there an updated study on the cost of tying the desalination plant to existing aqueducts in the 5-Cities area and SLO?
Thank you,
Patrick Lemieux

ex-member, Diablo Canyon Decommissioning Engagement Panel
August 24, 2022Other

Diablo Canyon's lifespan should NOT be extended.

August 24, 2022

Regarding DCNPP and the proposal to extend the life of the reactors, first of all, we need to admit that everything is guesswork. Will there be a catastrophic accident? Nobody knows. But meanwhile, Fukushima proved that as long as there are "beyond design basis" accidents, there are NO experts. Beyond design basis accidents are unevaluated, unexpected, unnatural, and hopefully unlikely -- but they might happen tomorrow, and no one will be able to stop it.

And in fact, so-called "solutions" for beyond design basis accidents are actually just mitigation of the catastrophic effects. How quickly can people be informed of the danger? How far from the plant must they be evacuated? When (if ever) can people go back to their homes? All of these (and many more potential actions) are mitigations after a catastrophic beyond design basis accident. They do not prevent that accident.

Shutdown does.

Also, to make the right decisions for future generations, we would need to know what to do with the nuclear waste it generates. While we might get some electricity today, future generations will have to manage the waste without getting any benefit, but with great risk and cost all their lives.

The less we leave them, and the cooler it is, the better for them.

Regarding the money Joe Biden has offered the nuclear industry, it is blood money. It is a bribe. Don't accept it. If some other state decides to take that bribe, they'll be the sucker.

Regarding the embrittlement of Unit 1, while it might be true that the steel pressure vessel is "ductile" when it is very hot, the question is: Can it be cooled properly? Nobody knows. But we do know that at Fukushima, they decided to pour ocean water on the reactor. Cold, salty, and millions of gallons were needed. Can Unit 1 survive that?

Regarding earthquakes, for some reason the "worst case scenario" is being considered in isolation. It is just a guess. It does not consider what happens if, say, the San Andreas fault causes the Hosgri fault to also snap. The reactor might be only slightly damaged from the first quake -- but will be hanging by a thread when the second quake happens, from another fault line, in a different direction.

Lastly, there is no reason to consider Diablo Canyon to be a good "baseload" system. Unscheduled shutdowns in older plants are far more common than in the middle of their lifespan. Diablo Canyon has already entered that phase.

Shut it down and keep it shut. Don't tempt fate.

Ace Hoffman
Carlsbad, California

Independent Researcher
August 24, 2022Proposed Extension of DCPP Operations

Hi, my name is Paris Ortiz-Wines, a 2nd generation Mexican-American, millennial, & Goleta local. As one whose family is being impacted by California’s energy austerity policies, I think it's important you hear from someone who has ties to these impacted communities you are referring to.

In 2020, California saw its first rotating blackouts since 2001, leaving nearly 2 million citizens without power for up to 24 hours – without notice! In fact, one of those areas was located in a lower-class neighborhood in LA.

In 2021, Californians saw their electricity prices increase by nearly 12%. Residents pay about 66% more for electricity than the rest of the country and as of March this year, 3.6 million residents struggled to pay their electricity bills, totaling over $1 billion.

Our energy austerity policies are placing the burden on our most vulnerable populations. Already we pay higher electricity prices during 4-9, (during our peak demand) because we do not have enough energy. This idea that people should just “use less” energy is elitist & out of touch. And if we are to close Diablo Canyon, our most reliable source of power we have, this will only worsen.

In fact, CAISO has stated that “In 2025, the state will have a capacity shortfall of about 1,800 MW, They have also projected annual electricity rate increases of between 4% and 9% between now and 2025.”

In the midst of a global energy and climate crisis, we cannot afford to lose 15% of our zero-carbon energy. The data is clear; When nuclear plants close, they are replaced with fossil fuels. When New York’s nuclear power plant, Indian Point, was prematurely shuttered, a closure that was celebrated by the NRDC, CO2 emissions from in-state electricity generation rose 35% in the first month. When the San Onofre Nuclear Plant was shut down, emissions in California increased by 37 Million Metric Tons of CO2e.

If Diablo is lost, 15.5 million metric tons of GHG emissions will be emitted between now & 2030.

To close diablo will be an environmental and social injustice.

Why aren’t we as concerned about all the diesel generators that are being shipped across the bay area and all the natural gas plants that will still exist if Diablo Canyon is wrongfully closed? Those are operating now, polluting the air, & increasing emissions.

Why wouldn’t we just continue to Invest in our existing clean energy infrastructure? Diablo Canyon can & should be operated for 20+ years more.

Poll.pdf
August 24, 2022Proposed Extension of DCPP Operations

Some panel members have injected their own opinions about technology options. For instance Bruce Severance asserted that when DCNPP closes, the grid will be balanced by hydrogen peaker plants. Hydrogen peaker plants have never been demonstrated anywhere in the world, and have unresolved technological barriers to implementation. Barriers that may prove intractable. Examples of that potential intractability include hydrogen embrittlement, greater leakage, and the lower caloric density and storage densities of hydrogen relative to natural gas. No one currently knows if those four points are show-stoppers, only that hydrogen is not a plug-in replacement for gas. This example and other statements suggest the panel may not be equipped to make informed comments about the necessity of this power plant for California's electrical system. We have an Independent System Operator with staff that specializes in the attributes of grid components. How about relying on them to determine the right generation mix?

None
August 24, 2022Proposed Extension of DCPP Operations

shut down as scheduled by 2025. There are numerous issues:
seismic vulnerability
violation of the closure agreement
unlawful cooling system
prohibitive cost
impedes growth of renewable sources of energy
capacity for storage of high level radioactive waste beyond 2025

Citizen of slo county
August 24, 2022Proposed Extension of DCPP Operations

Thank you for accepting comments.
The Governor’s DCPP Extension Legislation draft was developed through consultation with CAISO, and with CAISO as a co-sponsor. It aims to specifically address the problem of system reliability. This is an area where CAISO is the relevant expert.
By contrast the assembly’s counterproposal does not rely on the findings of system experts, but rather favors technologies promoted by activists, lobbyists, and anti-nuclear groups.
It is understandable that many Decommissioning Panel members are deeply invested in pressing forward with decommissioning; and have vested interests. However, neither the panel, nor the State Assembly, have relevant expertise in grid reliability, or what technologies contribute to reliability. That is CAISO’s area.
Therefor a responsible approach would be to rely on the organization with knowledge to determine what is necessary for system reliability. And that recommendation is to extend DCNPP operations into the next NRC license period. I urge this panel to adjust to the decision that provides the system reliability that California residents require.
Thank you.

August 24, 2022Proposed Extension of DCPP Operations

I am a local resident living in this county for the last
60+ yrs. my main concern is lack of adequate
Storage for continued use of nuclear fuel rod waste

August 24, 2022Proposed Extension of DCPP Operations

Thank you for your time and commitment to thoughtfully considering this topic.

I would like to share a comment in support of the extension of Diablo Canyon Power Plant. Keeping Diablo Canyon online isn’t getting in the way of building more renewables and storage, but taking it offline will mean a disastrous hit to California's economy and cost of living, quality of life (blackouts), and carbon emissions.

If Gov. Newsom could solve California’s projected electricity shortages with renewables, he certainly would. But there is no viable path for California to replace the 24/7 available electricity Diablo Canyon, which accounts for 9% of the state’s electricity generation, with other carbon-free energy sources by 2025.

In addition, we’ll need even more carbon-free electricity to meet state emissions targets and the electric vehicle mandate. Diablo Canyon is a meaningful contributor to this, and we should be only adding to our carbon-free energy generation options, not taking them away.

California has been a pioneer in the climate change movement, and keeping Diablo online will allow it to remain an example to others on how to build out a strong mix of carbon-free energy sources.

August 24, 2022Proposed Extension of DCPP Operations

Please extend DCPP operations by 10+ years, it’s the only ethical and logical thing to do in face of power shortages, climate change and conserving the environment.

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